Monday, September 10, 2018

COMPELLED: Week 1 - Humility




Welcome to a new 15-week series where I share quotes, examples, and/or stories about 15 of the characteristics that I believe are demonstrated by Compelled Educators everywhere. 

I hope you will share your favorite quote or story each week in the comments below. You can also leave a comment on the Compelled Educator Facebook page






Have you ever been around a person who is not humble? I once knew a school principal who was not. Because of this, he didn't delegate well.  1) He thought he could do it better, and 2) he wanted to take the credit for almost everything that worked or was a positive for the school. Rarely did he talk about the team, and often he took credit for it being his idea. 

I also once knew of a superintendent who was not humble. When something good happened, she would credit herself and the team, but when something not so positive happened she would recognize the individual "responsible" - not making herself a part of the "team" in those instances. 



"The fullest and best ears of corn hang lowest to the ground."  
-Bishop Reynolds


I've also been around people who displayed false humility, and it is something I struggled with when I was younger. I felt it was prideful to accept compliments, always shrugging them off while belittling myself inside my head. As I have grown older I've learned more about myself, about shame, and the difference between true humility and false humility. (This chart is a great tool for comparison.)





Kate Nasser, The People Skills Coach, wrote a great article called "Humility People Skills: 10 Ways to Stay Humble in Success." 

Here are my three favorite suggestions from her list, as I can personally relate to these three more than the others:

1. Once a week, have someone teach you something they do well that you don’t.  Being a willing student helps you stay humble.

2. See those who live with a severe chronic illness and still give generously of themselves.  Humility redefines struggle and strength.

3. Become and stay curious with others. Ask one question each day to expand the mind and humbly learn from different views. Humility can be intensely interesting and enjoyable.  Curiosity sparks humility.

(What is your favorite suggestion from Kate's list? Leave me a comment!)


Humility magnifies other positive characteristics, and I'll soon be leading a twitter chat on how humility shows up in leadership. I hope you can join #APchat on September 30, 2018 at 8pmCST and contribute to the conversation. 



True humility is not thinking less of yourself; 
it is thinking of yourself less. 
-C.S. Lewis



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4 comments:

  1. You shared my favorite quote about humility with the C.S. Lewis one! It is a beautiful reminder of what true humility looks like. When I feel myself getting overwhelmed, it is usually because I have become too "me-focused," and Mrs. Gibson gave me the best advice one day when she said the best thing to do in those moments is to go out and serve others. She is so right because it changes my mindset to an "others-focus," and my attitude and perspective are immediately transformed. Love this new series! Excited to read!!

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  2. "Pride discourages. Humility inspires."

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  3. I like the idea of learning something new from someone. Maybe even a student, they often have so much to offer!

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  4. I love the C.S.Lewis quote--really drives home the definition of humility. I have taken up a new fitness activity and I would agree learning new things from an experienced person keeps you humble. Looking forward to the remaining posts.

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